TOUS LES ARTICLES

Elvire Bonduelle

Elvire Bonduelle

Artiste

www.elvirebonduelle.com

Elvire Bonduelle est diplômée de l'Ecole des Beaux-arts de Paris en 2005. Elle vit à Paris et elle travaille et expose en France et à l'étranger. Elvire Bonduelle revendique le joli, l’esthétique sans abandonner le propos et le concept qu’elle transmet toujours avec une pointe d’humour et d’ironie. Elle propose, dans ses œuvres, une autre vision du monde en décalant son point de vue, comme dans « Le Meilleur Monde » un vrai-faux numéro du quotidien Le Monde à l'identique, constitué uniquement de bonnes nouvelles .
    • 1 - 4 coins d'attente 7
      4 coins d'attente 7
    • 2 - 4 coins d'attente 5
      4 coins d'attente 5
    • 3 - 4 coins d'attente 4
      4 coins d'attente 4
    • + 3 media(s)
    Thème : Arts plastiques
    • 1 - Les dessins à la règle - Los Angeles
      Les dessins à la règle - Los Angeles
    • 2 - Les dessins à la règle - Los Angeles
      Les dessins à la règle - Los Angeles
    • 3 - Les dessins à la règle - Los Angeles
      Les dessins à la règle - Los Angeles
    • + 13 media(s)
    Thème : Arts plastiques
    • 1 - Book-ends_Third_one
      Book-ends_Third_one
    • 2 - BE_LAABF2
      BE_LAABF2
    • 3 - BE_LAABF_vueG
      BE_LAABF_vueG
    • + 4 media(s)
    Thème : Arts plastiques
  • Travelling bus

    Il y a 8 ans

    / Travaux

    Thème : Arts plastiques
    • 1 - BM_résille_3
      BM_résille_3
    • 2 - BM_résille_2
      BM_résille_2
    • 3 - BM_résille
      BM_résille
    • + 19 media(s)
    Thème : Arts plastiques
    • 1 - livre_sda
      livre_sda
    • 2 - salle d'att III - 9bis
      salle d'att III - 9bis
    • 3 - salle d'att III - 9
      salle d'att III - 9
    • + 16 media(s)
    Thème : Arts plastiques
  • Entretien with M. Higgins

    Il y a 7 ans

    / Travaux / El mejor Pais

    Entretien with M. Higgins
    News production is a highly subjective art. First of all, it is a production. The vast majority of human events go unnoticed by the media lens, and a large proportion of what could quite legitimately be included ends up on the cutting room floor.The French artist, Elvire Bonduelle, has mirrored the selectivity of this process by her creation this year of a special edition of the Spanish newspaper, El País, consisting only of positive news stories, which she has called El mejor País (The best Country). In total, 3,000 copies of the newspaper were printed as part of her 'Pour faire joli' ('To make nice') exhibition and distributed on the streets of Madrid to unsuspecting members of the public.
    What inspired your newspaper project? Were there any differences to your Le Monde project of last year?
    I was first inspired by the bad energies I realised I was eating everyday just by reading the news. But I didn't want to stop [reading]. I wanted to be aware of what happens in the world. I don't want to be an artist who stays apart of the world and does some crazy things in their studio.Le Monde is 'my' newspaper, I read it almost everyday, so when I did 'Le meilleur Monde' ('The best World') it was something very close to me. El mejor País was a collaboration work as I am not Spanish and needed some clues to understand national politics. So it became more global and mixed various subjectivities, mine, those of my collaborators, and then also El País's as they were deeply involved in the project and asked to remove two articles.How long did it take to fill each newspaper with positive stories?Le meilleur Monde and El mejor País both took me about three and a half months each, which means it takes approximately 100 issues to make a positive one! One per cent! I didn't intend to criticize the media, but in the end it became a real subject. For example, on front pages there is almost never good news. Does it mean good news doesn't sell? So we readers must be partly responsible for it.It was long and hard work as I decided to read each article of each issue during the 100 day period, and then tried to create a paper with exactly the same layout. Sometimes there are some white spaces as I didn't want to put advertisements nor to publish articles that were not so positive. In the end, most choices are conflicts of love and duty. It's a crazy thing!
    What sort of response have you had both from both the newspapers and your audience?
    Well ... I have to say it has been a great success for both 'best newspapers'! People are very enthusiastic about the concept. They all seem to be suffering from too much bad news that flows day by day. And they want to know more. They want to see it for real and check its positivity. Most of the time they agree with the choices made. Sometimes they ask, "Why this article ?" A polemic begins, and people realize that the whole project is very subjective. Then some ask which kind of news is the most difficult to find, and why some articles are so scary about the actual state of things, even if full of hope. But they all ask for more. They say they would read it each week if only it could be a weekly newspaper!
    Can you explain a little about the ‘Cravaches’ ('Whips') installation in your exhibition, which replaced with whips the shafts that normally protect complementary newspapers in bars and cafes?
    Yes, newspapers become a masochistic tool with the whips. I like the idea of increasing one's power by reading daily news. I actually don't want to quit reading it. Reading daily news is the active way of being aware of what happens in the world, it is voluntarily facing the truth of things that happen, including extreme violence.The person who tells you some news will surely, possibly unconsciously, add their subjectivity. And we don't need to add more subjectivity to news as there is already that of the media's. The journalists at the scene have the power, we only have leftovers. But the more power you can get you should take as it makes you stronger to face reality, to choose what you want to be, in which world you want to live, in order to be happy. One has to try hard to take part in democracy. We have to use the little freedom, the little power we still have to choose how we want the world to be. And it's a tough thing to accomplish because to do so you have to be aware of what politics says, and plan and do, or not. I am sure reading the news helps a bit!
    How does this work fit into your wider work and the ‘Pour faire joli' ('To make nice') exhibition?
    Well my work is, from the very beginning, entirely directed by a kind of 'quest for happiness'. It happens to be any kind of pieces, objects, drawings, videos, installations, anything I imagine and create in order to make life more ... pleasant.I often do stuff that fits in at home which can be useful, such as furniture, in order to make life more comfortable. I decided art should be more important and present in our everyday lives, as it can be powerful sometimes! But it should not be too sacred: for example, I'm doing many chairs for a long time because it is our adaptors to Earth, and also because I like the idea that people will first look at it as a piece of art, with respect, admiration - maybe more - and then simply sit on it.I did these two best newspaper to bring more happiness in our lives by sharing good news. The greatest part of these two experiences is the performances: to go on the street and distribute these special issues by shouting "Le meilleur Monde! Or El mejor Pais! Only good news! It's for free!" People take it, take a few steps and turn back, "Only good news? It's not possible!"
    I hope I'll be soon shouting in English, "The best _____! Only good news! it 's for free!"

    News production is a highly subjective art. First of all, it is a production. The vast majority of human events go unnoticed by the media lens, and a large proportion of what could quite legitimately be included ends up on the cutting room floor.The French artist, Elvire Bonduelle, has mirrored the selectivity of this process by her creation this year of a special edition of the Spanish newspaper, El País, consisting only of positive news stories, which she has called El mejor País (The best Country). In total, 3,000 copies of the newspaper were printed as part of her 'Pour faire joli' ('To make nice') exhibition and distributed on the streets of Madrid to unsuspecting members of the public.

    What inspired your newspaper project? Were there any differences to your Le Monde project of last year?

    I was first inspired by the bad energies I realised I was eating everyday just by reading the news. But I didn't want to stop [reading]. I wanted to be aware of what happens in the world. I don't want to be an artist who stays apart of the world and does some crazy things in their studio.Le Monde is 'my' newspaper, I read it almost everyday, so when I did 'Le meilleur Monde' ('The best World') it was something very close to me. El mejor País was a collaboration work as I am not Spanish and needed some clues to understand national politics. So it became more global and mixed various subjectivities, mine, those of my collaborators, and then also El País's as they were deeply involved in the project and asked to remove two articles.How long did it take to fill each newspaper with positive stories?Le meilleur Monde and El mejor País both took me about three and a half months each, which means it takes approximately 100 issues to make a positive one! One per cent! I didn't intend to criticize the media, but in the end it became a real subject. For example, on front pages there is almost never good news. Does it mean good news doesn't sell? So we readers must be partly responsible for it.It was long and hard work as I decided to read each article of each issue during the 100 day period, and then tried to create a paper with exactly the same layout. Sometimes there are some white spaces as I didn't want to put advertisements nor to publish articles that were not so positive. In the end, most choices are conflicts of love and duty. It's a crazy thing!

    What sort of response have you had both from both the newspapers and your audience?

    Well ... I have to say it has been a great success for both 'best newspapers'! People are very enthusiastic about the concept. They all seem to be suffering from too much bad news that flows day by day. And they want to know more. They want to see it for real and check its positivity. Most of the time they agree with the choices made. Sometimes they ask, "Why this article ?" A polemic begins, and people realize that the whole project is very subjective. Then some ask which kind of news is the most difficult to find, and why some articles are so scary about the actual state of things, even if full of hope. But they all ask for more. They say they would read it each week if only it could be a weekly newspaper!

    Can you explain a little about the ‘Cravaches’ ('Whips') installation in your exhibition, which replaced with whips the shafts that normally protect complementary newspapers in bars and cafes?

    Yes, newspapers become a masochistic tool with the whips. I like the idea of increasing one's power by reading daily news. I actually don't want to quit reading it. Reading daily news is the active way of being aware of what happens in the world, it is voluntarily facing the truth of things that happen, including extreme violence.The person who tells you some news will surely, possibly unconsciously, add their subjectivity. And we don't need to add more subjectivity to news as there is already that of the media's. The journalists at the scene have the power, we only have leftovers. But the more power you can get you should take as it makes you stronger to face reality, to choose what you want to be, in which world you want to live, in order to be happy. One has to try hard to take part in democracy. We have to use the little freedom, the little power we still have to choose how we want the world to be. And it's a tough thing to accomplish because to do so you have to be aware of what politics says, and plan and do, or not. I am sure reading the news helps a bit!

    How does this work fit into your wider work and the ‘Pour faire joli' ('To make nice') exhibition?

    Well my work is, from the very beginning, entirely directed by a kind of 'quest for happiness'. It happens to be any kind of pieces, objects, drawings, videos, installations, anything I imagine and create in order to make life more ... pleasant.I often do stuff that fits in at home which can be useful, such as furniture, in order to make life more comfortable. I decided art should be more important and present in our everyday lives, as it can be powerful sometimes! But it should not be too sacred: for example, I'm doing many chairs for a long time because it is our adaptors to Earth, and also because I like the idea that people will first look at it as a piece of art, with respect, admiration - maybe more - and then simply sit on it.I did these two best newspaper to bring more happiness in our lives by sharing good news. The greatest part of these two experiences is the performances: to go on the street and distribute these special issues by shouting "Le meilleur Monde! Or El mejor Pais! Only good news! It's for free!" People take it, take a few steps and turn back, "Only good news? It's not possible!"

    I hope I'll be soon shouting in English, "The best _____! Only good news! it 's for free!"

    Interview with Martin Higgins for "The Eternities", November 2011
    Suite
    Thème : Arts plastiques
  • Texte par Estelle Nabeyrat

    Il y a 7 ans

    / Presse / Communiqué

    Texte par Estelle Nabeyrat
    Il est des revendications parfois inconfortables et périlleuses, et dans l'art tout autant - et tout étrange aussi - la quête du bonheur en est l'une des plus délicates. C'est qu'un art de la félicité risque sa forme au détriment de son contenu, comme si l'un se versait dans l'autre pour en tarir la substance.
    Il est en réalité une conquête bien plus militante, bien moins futile et plus concernée, une esthétisation autant qu'une conceptualisation du quotidien, des choses et de notre rapport aux êtres, un engagement modelé en échappatoire. Et lorsqu'Elvire Bonduelle collecte les journaux quotidiens, Le Monde ou El Pais, pour n'en garder que les bonnes nouvelles, elle participe de ce que De Certeau nommait « l'activité scriptuaire » ou comment reprendre en main l'écriture d'une histoire présente dont le système nous a dépossédés, comment faire de la lecture, bien qu'ordinaire, un espace critique et propre à chacun. Chanter la vie, ses légèretés autant que ses petites idioties; fabriquer des modules pour « arrondir les angles »; des coussins-cales, petites béquilles aux inconforts de tous-les-jours, les larmes devenant des motifs inoffensifs et enjoliveurs, sérigraphiés sur les pages des journaux ou sur les T-shirt pour en conjurer l'affect. Elvire Bonduelle a su construire un répertoire d'images et d'objets au potentiel joyeux (en apparence); une pointe de naïveté (de surface) dont elle s'amuse tout autant. Car savoir rire des choses autant que de soi, c'est respecter la logique de l'ironie. Et par contraste, c'est tout autant une difficulté à être au monde qu'Elvire laisse subtilement transparaître dans ses oeuvres.

    Pour son exposition personnelle chez Onestar Press, l'artiste nous présente une nouvelle étape de son travail avec un ensemble d'oeuvres qui s'articule selon des modalités iconiques fortes : drôles et raides à la fois, superficielles au primo piano, profondes al'secondo. Il y a tout d'abord une Moulure, qui forge l'espace de sa présence, reprise de formes haussmanniennes transformées en monolithe, contemplative autant que contemplatoire. La forme épouse celle du corps au repos, une onde dictée par un effet architectural et ornemental dont la rigueur à l'élégance associée rythme l'apparence des grands quartiers parisiens. D'abord placées en extérieur pour s'offrir au paysage, les Moulures se domesticisent dans l'espace de la galerie, version salon, peut-être, ou salle d'attente, que le blanc immaculé vient rappeler une version en manteau neigeux, un modèle alpin que l'artiste a réalisé à Innsbruck. Il n'y a là plus d'échappée sur un jardin, vestiges d'un temple grec placés dans un parc ou au sommet d'une montagne; la Moulure offre la perspective d'une introspection, pensées propices aux aires d'attente avec leurs images aux murs prêtes à recevoir toute forme de divagations.
    Voilà bien longtemps que le mobilier anime le travail d'Elvire Bonduelle qui en a déjà réalisé plusieurs : chaises à pique-nique, Do, ré, mi, ou les chaises de salle d'attente, Fauteuils pour livres de poche, Adaptateurs, assises et autres mobiliers de circonstance... et c'est peut-être parce que « bien-s'asseoir » est un des nombreux dérivés de la bienséance qu'Elvire se plait à en détourner les usages.
    Accrochés en face, des dessins qu'Elvire a tracés à la règle, comme on apprend studieusement à le faire à l'école, se servant de la palette de tous ses motifs prédécoupés : lettrines et formes géométriques prêtes à être reportées . Maison, voiture, chien ; éléments du bonheur pavillonnaire qui intitulent officieusement une série tirée là en grand format. Les dessins tracés au crayon papier et aux crayons de couleur, aux feutres et stylos bics, sont agrandis dans un processus mimétique les reliant à la Moulure comme dans une nécessité de conformisme relatif aux objets d'intérieur. Il y a aussi quelques palais et intérieurs à l'atmosphère inquiétante, car autant qu'être des espaces potentiellement désirables, sans figures humaines comme pour mieux s'y projeter, les dessins qu'Elvire place en vis à vis suggèrent leur vocation standardisatrice. Comme les Moulures, formes extrudées produites en masse pour les intérieurs bourgeois au point qu'elles pourraient être rapprochées d'une production industrielle, les dessins intriguent les zones de formatages.

    Par ces brèches, Elvire Bonduelle opère dans un champ de citations qui, fondatrices de l'histoire de l'art, se rappellent comme ici à des formes, des techniques et des pratiques d'une autre époque, comme dans les dessins dont les perspectives biaisées n'ont pas uniquement une valeur enfantine, mais sont plus directement liées aux peintures du Moyen-âge, avant que la Renaissance ne théorise la perspective à coup de théories savantes. Notions, images et styles survivent, c 'est ce que Didi-Hubermann précise au regard du projet warburgien, le travail d'Elvire Bonduelle intègre pleinement ce processus, les bibliothèques sont vidées de leur contenu pour laisser planer une absence; ses référents agissent comme des fantômes du savoir pour venir s'installer dans l'état d'un objet, d'une situation ou d'un dessin et mieux en déplacer les contours et tracer encore plus loin son relais.
    Suite
    Thème : Arts plastiques
  • Introduction au livre "Salle d'attente"

    Il y a 7 ans

    / Presse / Elvire Bonduelle - Salle d'attente

    Introduction au livre "Salle d'attente"
    Les conditions dans lesquelles on voit les œuvres sont lamentables. Les expositions sont très fréquentées, et parfois par des imbéciles. On ne peut que rester debout et regarder, en général avec quelqu'un d'autre. Il n'y a pas d'espace, pas d'intimité, nulle part où s'asseoir ou se coucher, on ne peut ni boire, ni manger, ni penser, ni vivre. Ce n'est qu'une présentation. Ce n'est que de l'information.

    Écrits 1963-1990, Donald Judd, 1991, Édition Daniel Lelong

    Car tout est là : bien souvent, nous ne voyons rien. Nous forçons notre regard, à vouloir voir absolument, là, maintenant, en trois minutes, en trente secondes. Pourquoi ne peut-on pas plus souvent s'asseoir face aux œuvres ?Salle d'attente III est le troisième volet d'une série d'expositions basée sur l'idée que les salles d'attente sont des parenthèses spatiotemporelles propices à la contemplation d'œuvres.

    À la galerie laurent mueller, cette nouvelle expérience réunit 26 artistes sur deux espaces reliés par un escalier. Comme si un seul temps d'attente ne suffisait pas, à l'étage, une seconde salle s'offre à nous.L'accrochage rappelle ceux des salles d'attente de cabinets médicaux, où chaque médecin a porté sa pierre à l'édifice. Untel a cloué le tableau d'un ami peintre, son confrère un tableau hérité, tandis que l'anesthésiste a placé une gravure désuète, une affiche démodée, et ainsi de suite.Dans notre salle d'attente, le visiteur sera d'abord pris d'une hésitation. Peut-on ou non s'asseoir sur l'un de ces trois bancs ? Après tout, on ne s'assoit pas sur l'art mais pourtant ces coussins semblent nous y inviter. Que lit-on dessus? Sit on it, Wait and See, Là ça va... Autant d'injonctions au laisser-aller, à la patience, au repos. Et bien, asseyons-nous.Plongé dans l'attente, le regard du visiteur part à la dérive sur les murs, tissant entre les œuvres des liens inattendus. Un portemanteau, un monochrome, des photos, une horloge, des mots brésiliens, des dessins. De cet ensemble disparate émerge un dialogue où se fondent les notions autrefois distinctes de mobilier, de décoration et d’art. Tout s'entremêle, brouillant les pistes et les conventions.

    À l'étage, la tension monte. Encore une salle d'attente. Elle est bien plus petite, le plafond est bas et les deux portes sont closes. Tapissée d'un motif pariétal on se croirait presque dans une grotte, une caverne, l'antre d'un médecin aux goûts étranges. Une musique alterne avec une vidéo qui, une fois encore, nous renvoie au sentiment d'attente. Attendez-donc, vous êtes le prochain sur la liste.

    E.B.

    L'ouvrage "Salle d'attente", conçu par Elvire Bonduelle et publié par la galerie complète l’exposition.
    Suite
    Thème : Arts plastiques
  • Goodies

    Il y a 8 ans

    / Travaux

    • 1 - serviettes borderline
      serviettes borderline
    • 2 - arcade_atelier
      arcade_atelier
    • 3 - nombrils
      nombrils
    • + 33 media(s)
    Thème : Arts plastiques